Order and Chaos

This is my second and final blog post. This blog finds us on bittersweet terms. The good news is I am flying Air Singapore which is very nice and luxurious. The bad news is I am leaving all my kids and all the beautiful emotions, sensations, and experience of India behind. Saying goodbye to the kids was one of the hardest goodbyes of my life. Obviously saying goodbye to all of my family to go to military school was much harder, but I felt a special connection to these children. I grew to love them as my own, as if I was their father and mentor. In just five days we developed a bond with these kids that was stronger than anything. The language barrier did not affect this bonding experience; it almost reinforced it because we grew to care for each other based on our true personalities and not through words. It was so hard for me to walk away from that school, knowing I will likely never return or see any of my kids again. However, it has instilled in me a great desire to be a father someday. I cannot wait to feel that kind of love and more for my own children.

India is very imperfect. It is chaotic and dirty and full of pain and suffering. India is a buffet of worldly suffering and desperate people. But admits all of this there is truly magnificent beauty all around. There is beauty in the mountains; taller than any we will ever see, beauty in the hills; checkered with step-farms and simple, colorful cottages, beauty in the simplicity of life; the absence of electricity and the stupid everyday drama of first-world living, and especially beauty in the love we have been shown; the way the children smile at you and the way their parents beam with gratitude that you are there, making a difference, without a word. It is beautiful chaos and it has been a truly life changing experience for me. I will never be the same. I urge everyone who gets the chance to read this to be the change they want to see in the world. Start by being kinder to those who frustrate you and more generous to those with less substance than you. Things like saying hello to people passing us on the sidewalk and things like asking a friend how he/she is doing. These are things we forget to do in America at times. We have been given much in our country, but it is always humbling to remember that if given the chance many of these children in India and elsewhere would soar so much higher than us. So let us take full advantage of what we have and make a difference in the world. In the wise words of Gandhi, “My life is my message.” What will your message say?

Michael Guynn